Meghan Markle and Prince Harry are reportedly hiring a nanny for baby Archie, but a celebrity nanny says it won’t be easy

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry are reportedly hiring a nanny for baby Archie, but a celebrity nanny says it won’t be easy

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry have hired a London agency to help find a nanny for baby Archie, Entertainment Tonight reported back in April. Although there has been no confirmation from the palace, this wouldn’t be the first time a royal has hired help from an outsider, as Prince William and Kate Middleton employ a nanny to look after all three of their children. Jennifer Smith has been a nanny for 26 years, and in that time she has worked for high-profile and celebrity clients including a pro athlete and “Lord of the Rings” actor Sean Astin. Smith broke down the biggest obstacles that baby Archie’s nanny will face, and told INSIDER how they should deal with the intense scrutiny that will come with working for one of the most famous couples in the world. Visit INSIDER’s homepage for more stories. Reports that Meghan Markle and Prince Harry are looking to hire a nanny have been circulating since before baby Archie was born on May 6. Entertainment Tonight first reported the couple had signed up to a London nanny agency back in April, although there have been no updates from the palace as to whether this is actually the case. However, fans will know it is not uncommon for royals to hire nannies, especially for when they attend high-profile public engagements. Read more: Inside Norland College, the British school that trains nannies for royals and the super rich After all, Kate Middleton and Pr
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The pandemonium of modern celebrity began in 19th-century theatre

The pandemonium of modern celebrity began in 19th-century theatre

Fans of the rapper Cardi B. Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Why do so many people care so much about celebrities? Just as each generation believes it invented sex, so each thinks it created celebrity. Ask someone born in the 21st century what defines celebrity culture, and they will likely single out the digital media that allow anyone with a cell phone to ‘like’, retweet and comment on a Kim Kardashian post in seconds. The mid-century cultural critics Theodor Adorno and Daniel Boorstin had a more paranoid view: they believed that the media imposed stars on a mindless public. Then in the 1980s and ’90s, the scholars Jackie Stacey and Henry Jenkins saw the public as in charge, making or breaking stars. In prosperous times, celebrity biographies tend to attribute stardom to talent, luck and hard work. In precarious times, we hear more about icons who self-destruct.All these views assign power to one and only one element in the equation: the media, the public or the stars. All of them are wrong – because all of them are right. No single group has the power to make or break a star. Three equally powerful groups collude and compete to define celebrities: media producers, members of the public and celebrities themselves. None has decisive power, and none is powerless.The three-way effort to create, define and undo celebrities is tireless. To become famous, the American rapper Cardi B had to do more than record catchy tunes. She had to promote them effectively to people who liked them. She had to
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